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Army Corps of Engineers: Some levees damaged in 2019 still vulnerable

The Corps says “challenging weather conditions and higher flows” continue, delaying the ability to fully assess damage.
Credit: AP
FILE- In this Oct. 22, 2019 photo, a barn sits in floodwaters in Pacific Junction, Iowa. Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri are joining forces for a study that will look for ways the states can limit flooding along the Missouri River and give them information about how wetter weather patterns could require changes to the federal government's management of the basin's reservoirs. The states are pooling their money to pay for half of a $400,000 study with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to measure how much water flows down the Missouri River. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

O'FALLON, Mo. — With flood concerns already high in the Midwest, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is warning that many levees on the Missouri and Kansas rivers that were damaged during last year’s devastating floods remain vulnerable to high water. 

The National Weather Service has said Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri and eastern North Dakota and South Dakota face an above-average flood risk this spring, due largely to soil saturation to the north. Record flooding in 2019 damaged several levees, many of which have yet to be repaired. 

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The Corps says “challenging weather conditions and higher flows” continue, delaying the ability to fully assess damage.